Michigan individuals who are blind often struggle with certain things that many take for granted, such as holding regular employment. Many people who are legally blind are able to work and enjoy a certain measure of independence. However, this is not the case for every blind individual. In some cases, blindness could be a legitimate reason to pursue disability benefits.

Those with visual impairments often face both physical and psychological challenges that make it difficult for them to remain in the workplace. Consequently, they may not be able to earn a living, resulting in an inability to pay for daily needs, housing and more. If you are blind or have a type of visual impairment and you find yourself in this situation, it may be time to consider a claim for disability benefits through the Social Security Administration. 

What disability can mean for you 

Individuals with blindness may not be able to work, and they can face additional expenses for medical care and other types of support. If you have a medical condition expected to last for at least one year or for the rest of your life, and you are unable to work because of it, you could be eligible for one of the following types of disability benefits: 

  • Supplemental Security Income: These benefits are for low-income individuals who are unable to work due to disabling medical conditions.
  • Social Security Disability Insurance: If you have a work history that includes paying Social Security taxes, you could be eligible for this type of benefits.

In order to qualify for disability benefits due to visual impairments, an individual must meet certain qualifications. If you think you may qualify, it can be helpful to first seek a full understanding of how the SSA evaluates field of vision, visual acuity and sight efficiency.

The process of getting the help you need

It is not always easy to secure disability benefits, even with a valid claim. It may be helpful for you to start with a complete evaluation of your case in order to understand the options available to you.

Many first-time applications come back denied. This is frustrating but not the end of the road for you. You can still fight for the help you need by seeking a reconsideration of your application or fighting for an appeal. The process can be complex, but you do not have to walk through it without help and legal support.