Robert D. Paulbeck, Attorney at Law
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What are some common property disputes between neighbors?

When many of us set out to buy a house in Trenton, we're often consumed by finding one that checks off all the boxes on our wish list. Many times, it includes physical attributes that we'd like our house to have but not what we're looking for in terms of neighbors. Maybe it should, though.

Researchers at FindLaw recently polled average Americans to find out how well they get along with their neighbors. At least 42 percent revealed that they'd previously fought with them.

One of the more pressing issues that can result in neighborly disputes includes a disagreement over where property lines start and end. Oftentimes, Michigan homeowners don't find out where these boundaries lie until their child ventures onto their neighbor's tract of land or they end up having to remove a chain length fence that encroached onto their property.

One of the best ways to ensure that you don't overstep onto your neighbor's property is by having a survey performed on your land so that you know what's yours and theirs.

When you have your property surveyed, your surveyor will draw up what's essentially a blueprint of the boundaries of your piece of land. They may even place stakes at various points around your property as a visual reference of where your property's limits lie. This can be helpful to reference when your neighbor claims that they're not responsible for maintaining a portion of their lot or if someone alleges that they have an easement.

One of the best ways to avoid a property dispute is by having an attorney review your purchase contract and relevant inspections, survey, deed and other legal documentation before you sign committing yourself to buy land or a home. By having them do this, they may identify contentious issues that can be costly to resolve in the future.

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